Presentation Materials for Twitter Adoption in U.S. Legislatures at #SMSociety 2016 Conference

The following are links to supporting materials for the presentation “Twitter Adoption in U.S. Legislatures: A Fifty-State Study” made to the 2016 International Conference on Social Media & Society on Wednesday, July 13 at Goldsmiths, University of London.

1. Free full-text access:

ACM DL Author-ize serviceTwitter Adoption in U.S. Legislatures: A Fifty-State Study

James M. Cook
SMSociety ’16 Proceedings of the 7th 2016 International Conference on Social Media & Society, 2016

2. Download Powerpoint Presentation Slides from presentation

3. Abstract: This study draws theoretical inspiration from the literature on Twitter adoption and Twitter activity in United States legislatures, applying predictions from those limited studies to all 7,378 politicians serving across 50 American state legislatures in the fall of 2015. Tests of bivariate association carried out for individual states lead to widely varying results, indicating an underlying diversity of legislative environments. However, a pooled multivariate analysis for all 50 states indicates that the number of constituents per legislator, district youth, district level of educational attainment, legislative professionalism, being a woman, sitting in the upper chamber, holding a leadership position, and legislative inexperience are all significantly and positively associated with Twitter adoption and Twitter activity. Controlling for these factors, legislator party, majority status, partisan instability, district income, and the percent of households in a state with an Internet connection are not significantly related to either Twitter adoption or recent Twitter use. A significant share of variation in social media adoption by legislators remains unexplained, leaving considerable room for further theoretical development and the development of contingent historical accounts.

Please feel free to review these materials before or after my presentation. I look forward to your comments.

Stages of Teaching and Learning Social Media Analytics (Presentation Notes)

This afternoon, I’ll be making a short presentation of thoughts on teaching social media analytics at the 2015 conference of the International Communication Association as part of its BlueSky Workshop on Tools for Teaching and Learning of Social Media Analytics. While the workshop is focused on the experience of teaching using a series of particular tools, I am interested in rejecting the question, “Which tools are best for teaching?,” and supplanting it with the idea of building capability in students in a progressive strategy. At different stages in students’ development as social media researchers, different analytic platforms may be more or less appropriate as teaching tools.

Below is a copy of notes for my presentation; notes can also be downloaded as a PDF here.

Objective: To introduce unexperienced undergraduate students to the process of analyzing social media with sufficient breadth that they may continue to learn independently.

Teaching Challenges Provoking Implementation:

  • As the mandate for higher education continues to widen, undergraduate students tend more and more to be non-traditional, to lack preparation, to lack confidence, and to be fascinated by but intimidated by math, research and technology.
  • Social media platforms are in a state of constant change.
  • Social media analytics packages and methods are rapidly evolving now and are likely to experience significant change in the next decade.

Learning Outcomes: Students who complete a course in social media analytics will be able to:

  1. Find and navigate social media platforms
  2. Recognize the common elements of social media:
    1. Individuals
    2. Actions
    3. Memberships
    4. Relationships
  3. Extract observations of these elements into datasets:
    1. Individual-level
    2. 1-mode network
    3. 2-mode network
  4. To analyze data and report data visualizations, qualitative categorizations and quantitative statistics

Strategy: A gentle, stepwise series of stages taking students from where they are to where they need to be, introducing students to a variety of analytic platforms, and focusing on the social research skills that will remain constant despite changes in social media and social media analytic platforms.

Stages of learning social media analytics, from Consumer to Manager to Secondhand Gatherer to Primary Gatherer to Analyst

Teaching Challenges in Implementation:

  • Universal access for students who no longer share a common campus, common hardware and common software
  • Reasonable yet challenging entry for students who come to class with a variety of previous experience and capabilities
  • A variety of reasonable endpoints for students who vary in their level of progression and accomplishment

Building Offline Community to study Online Community: the Social Media & Society Conference

Attending academic conferences can feel a bit like living in a retelling of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. A conference that’s too small can leave you feeling underfed. On the other hand, a conference that’s too large can be overwhelming, intimidating and even alienating. A conference on a highly particular subject may be quite useful if you select just the right one, but may be completely useless if you’re even slightly off the mark. The presentations at an overly general conference may lack those crucial connections that stimulate career-changing “aha!” insights. If you’ve been to enough conferences, you probably know what I mean.

How rare, and therefore how precious, is the conference that hits the Goldilocks sweet spot in between these distasteful extremes. The 2013 Social Media & Society International Conference was that conference for me. Gathering and connecting presentations on the causes, kinds and consequences of online social connection, #SMSociety13 managed to be more than simply the sum of its individual presentations. Researchers across diverse fields of social science, humanities, business and computer science shared distinctive approaches and concerns regarding the same substantive subject, which meant that we all had some basis for understanding but also had something to learn:

Topics of discussion at #SMSociety13, the 2013 Social Media and Society Conference

Attendance numbered in the sweetly moderate middle between a hundred and two hundred, providing a critical but collegial mass of thinkers who began conversations during one set of presentations and continued them across others. How do we bridge (or barricade) the quantitative-qualitative divide? How do we know who is “really” speaking in an online environment, and how do participants manage the online presentation of self? What are the ways in which online interaction leads to offline action? As we ran into one another again and again in various combinations, these questions carried over into the late night at a pub and over danishes in the morning, with an aggregate from far-flung places becoming a quirky community.

Photos from the 2013 Social Media and Society Conference at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia

The Social Media & Society International Conference meets again at Ryerson University in Toronto on September 27-28, 2014. Got a paper or panel in mind? Submit through this link: I’d love to see you there. Abstracts are due April 18. Poster proposals are due May 23.