Another Season, Another Public Figure Self-Immolates with Plagiarism

Another season, another new public plagiarism case.

It’s not a partisan thing. A different season, a different public plagiarism case:

David Greenberg: Why Biden’s plagiarism shouldn’t be forgotten.”

Students, listen up: Of course there are moral implications when you steal others’ words and pass them off as your own. Of course the choice to plagiarize keeps you shallow because you haven’t bothered to do the work of thinking for yourself. Even if you don’t care about that, plagiarism is a horrible strategic choice. Your reputation will be destroyed. You’ll find yourself making the defense that you’re not malicious, “just” incompetent and sloppy. Any actual original work you do will be discounted. Your career will be stunted.

The best protection against plagiarism is to use your own brain to think up, then write, something truly original and your own. If you can’t manage that, then why are you writing or speaking in the first place? For written forms that require thorough research of others’ contributions — to which you then should add your own original thoughts — be polite: quote and cite. Although academic integrity policies can take many words to express the standard, avoiding plagiarism really is that simple.

A tip of the hat to journalist Jarrett Hill for uncovering the latest in intellectual theft.

Don’t-Miss UMA Colloquium: Laura Rodas on Academic Integrity, 2/12/2014

The UMA RaP Colloquium Series presents

“The State of Academic Integrity at UMA”

Laura Rodas, Coordinator of Community Standards and Mediation
Wednesday, February 12, 12 noon
University of Maine at Augusta Katz Library

As part of its continuing commitment to building intellectual community, the University of Maine at Augusta holds a regular Research and Pedagogy (RaP) colloquium series at which UMA faculty and staff present works in progress to their peers. Ensuing discussion promotes collaboration through the exchange of ideas and the development of relationships across colleges, programs, departments and disciplines. When we meet to present and to learn, we discover that amidst the accumulated knowledge of the centuries, there are still new thoughts to be spoken out loud.

Academic honesty in higher education is of the utmost importance. During February 12th’s RaP session, Laura Rodas will lead discussion focused on UMA’s Academic Integrity Code and procedures, the responsibilities of faculty members, students, and the Office of the Dean of Students and the logistics of making a complaint.  Special attention will be paid to delineation of academic sanctions vs. disciplinary sanctions, repeat violations, and examples of challenging academic integrity matters.  A question and answer period with refreshments will follow.

The Research And Pedagogy program is made possible by the support of the Faculty Senate and the Office of the Provost.  If you are interested in giving a presentation at a future RAP session, please contact: