Feeling Like a Fraud in the First Year of College (and why that’s OK)

When I ask students in their first year of college how they’re doing, I often get a pained look in response. it’s common for students to feel a bit (or maybe a whole lot) like they don’t fit, even like they’re a fraud, not a “real student.” Do you ever feel that way? Well, here’s a confession: I felt that way myself when I got started as an undergraduate student, and it took me some time to shake that feeling. It turns out that this kind of feeling is absolutely normal and even a kind of standard part of getting used to a new role. As Erving Goffman explains in his dramaturgical theory of social interaction (Goffman 1959), we are all in a sense playing roles on a public stage, trying to pull off our scenes, trying to remember our lines. Difficulty in performing a role like that of student doesn’t mean you’re a bad human being — it just means you need to be patient with yourself and give yourself a bit of time to practice your new role before you can feel like you’ve truly nailed it. I share my thoughts on this subject in the video below:

William Shakespeare shared this sentiment in two of his plays:

“Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more: it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.”
– Macbeth

“All the world’s a stage,
and all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts.”
– As You Like It

Goffman would agree with the second quote, but disagree heartily with the second quote. For Goffman, the lines we deliver and the successful scenes we accomplish in interaction signify a great deal. Indeed, the whole point of our strutting and fretting our hour upon the stage is to learn how to signify to one another. An undergraduate’s role in the first year is hard, because a college or university education involves a whole new way of signifying what matters, how it matters, and how we know what matters.

The bottom line? Feeling like a fraud in the first year of the undergraduate experience is not just normal; it’s actually OK, a sign of growth, a sign that you’re extending yourself into a new role. As the popular slogan goes, you just have to “fake it till you make it,” to keep practicing the new role until you get the part down well. A die-hard dramaturgist might say that there’s really no difference between someone who perfectly impersonates a success and an actual success.

Just keep practicing, keep pretending until the pretense becomes real. You can do it.

Reference

Goffman, Erving. 1959. The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. New York: Random House

Learning Unbounded: EdX Introduction to R

It’s an open secret: to be a university professor is to be a perpetual student.  Learning doesn’t stop with the PhD; there’s always something new to read, always something new to discover, always something new to write, always something new to analyze, always a new technique to understand. This is why academics love the summer: finally, after teaching what we’ve already learned, we can learn some more!

One of my projects this summer is to bone up on the basics of a computer program for data analysis and visualization called R.  When I was a graduate student in the 1990s, statistical software was produced exclusively by companies at a fairly steep price.  Even now SAS 9.4, a software package used for data analysis in the academic and business communities, costs many thousands of dollars for an individual license (it’s so expensive that SAS won’t publish its price publicly).  If you were lucky, you had access to a university lab with software already installed.  If you didn’t have access and you wanted to run an analysis beyond the simplest level, you were simply out of luck.

All that changed with the introduction of R, a free and open-source program that runs on Windows computers, Mac computers, Unix computers and even web servers.  Methodologists from all kinds of disciplines are increasingly devoted to the development and extension of R, meaning that the latest analytical techniques are regularly added to R through easily added plug-ins called “packages.” R is easy to download, quick to install, and …

… well, I’d like to say it’s easy to run, but the truth is that for a generation that has grown up using pointing and clicking, it may be a bit intimidating to see a program with a command prompt that requires you to work almost entirely by entering text commands at prompts or developing programs of saved commands:

Screenshot of R running in the Windows environment

Still, with a bit of practice, it’s not much harder to type in text commands than it is to choose options in a drop-down menu.  The difference is that with drop-down menus, all options are presented to you in an organized fashion.  When you use R, you have to start out knowing what the commands are, and if you don’t know, you have to go find out.  It’s not R’s responsibility to show you what to do; it’s your responsibility to learn what R can do.  This is learning unbounded.

I became familiar with R by necessity earlier this year, when I needed to generate robust variance estimates in order to account for clustering in a sample.  That option isn’t available in most free menu-driven statistical programs, and I had a budget of $0 for my research project, so I installed R and the package rms by Frank E. Harrell, Jr.  R got the job done.

Since then, I’ve become aware that R can do much more than run a statistical analysis.  It can be used to gather data automatically.  It can be used to write automated webpages.  It can be used to create simulations.  It can visualize patterns in data with amazing graphics and videos (browse through the Google+ community for Statistics and R to get a taste of the possibilities).  But this level of high-end performance requires a more fundamental understanding of R than I’ve got right now.  To get back to basics and build myself a good foundation of understanding, I’ve started EdX’s Introduction to R Programming course.  This is another example of learning unbounded.  It’s an entirely online educational experience, I haven’t paid a cent to enroll, and I’m finding myself interacting with people from all over the globe in the course’s discussion sections.  Students in this course are asked to introduce themselves and say a little bit about where they’re from.  On a whim this morning, I tallied up the countries represented among students in the R course.  They are:

The United States isn’t even the top spot for R students; that position is taken by India, and there are 48 nations sending at least one student to the course. Just as the way we produce knowledge is changing, so is the way we learn how to produce knowledge.

P.S. Faced with a generation of academic and business analysts flocking to R, SAS has lost significant market share. Earlier this year, SAS responded by making a partial version of its software available for free. This software is called SAS University Edition and can be downloaded here. I’ve found installation to be more complicated and time-consuming than for R (the whopping download of a 1.8 GB installation file and the need to first install Oracle VM VirtualBox management software accounts for most of this difficulty), but I’m hopeful that I’ll have this second package of analytical software up and running soon so that I can compare the ease and power of the two programs.

Stages of Teaching and Learning Social Media Analytics (Presentation Notes)

This afternoon, I’ll be making a short presentation of thoughts on teaching social media analytics at the 2015 conference of the International Communication Association as part of its BlueSky Workshop on Tools for Teaching and Learning of Social Media Analytics. While the workshop is focused on the experience of teaching using a series of particular tools, I am interested in rejecting the question, “Which tools are best for teaching?,” and supplanting it with the idea of building capability in students in a progressive strategy. At different stages in students’ development as social media researchers, different analytic platforms may be more or less appropriate as teaching tools.

Below is a copy of notes for my presentation; notes can also be downloaded as a PDF here.


Objective: To introduce unexperienced undergraduate students to the process of analyzing social media with sufficient breadth that they may continue to learn independently.

Teaching Challenges Provoking Implementation:

  • As the mandate for higher education continues to widen, undergraduate students tend more and more to be non-traditional, to lack preparation, to lack confidence, and to be fascinated by but intimidated by math, research and technology.
  • Social media platforms are in a state of constant change.
  • Social media analytics packages and methods are rapidly evolving now and are likely to experience significant change in the next decade.

Learning Outcomes: Students who complete a course in social media analytics will be able to:

  1. Find and navigate social media platforms
  2. Recognize the common elements of social media:
    1. Individuals
    2. Actions
    3. Memberships
    4. Relationships
  3. Extract observations of these elements into datasets:
    1. Individual-level
    2. 1-mode network
    3. 2-mode network
  4. To analyze data and report data visualizations, qualitative categorizations and quantitative statistics

Strategy: A gentle, stepwise series of stages taking students from where they are to where they need to be, introducing students to a variety of analytic platforms, and focusing on the social research skills that will remain constant despite changes in social media and social media analytic platforms.

Stages of learning social media analytics, from Consumer to Manager to Secondhand Gatherer to Primary Gatherer to Analyst

Teaching Challenges in Implementation:

  • Universal access for students who no longer share a common campus, common hardware and common software
  • Reasonable yet challenging entry for students who come to class with a variety of previous experience and capabilities
  • A variety of reasonable endpoints for students who vary in their level of progression and accomplishment

Call for Applications: Maine Policy Scholar Program

Are you a University of Maine at Augusta student taking classes in the 2015-2016 academic year? Are you interested in politics and/or policy?  Are you looking for a way to take your work to the next level?

The University of Maine at Augusta, continuing its association with the Maine Community Foundation, has the opportunity to nominate a Maine Policy Scholar for the 2015-2016 academic year.  The successful applicant to the Maine Policy Scholar program receives a $1,500 scholarship with a budget of $1,000 for research expenses, and is expected to delve into applied research into a real Maine policy issue.

As the UMA advisor for the program, I’ll be working throughout next year with next year’s Maine Policy Scholar to help her or him in developing and carrying out an applied research program.  The selected student will also participate in three-four statewide meetings with faculty and scholars from across the University of Maine system for rigorous review of progress.  The year culminates in the presentation of a research memo to a board of state political leaders convened by the Maine Community Foundation. This memo has historically been also directed to a Maine political leader relevant to the subject of the student’s research, such as the Governor or the head of a state executive agency.  This is a good chance to gain valuable experience while you make a difference in Maine policy.

Applicants must be matriculated UMA students with a GPA of at least 3.00, and must have completed 60 or more credits of coursework by September 2015.  Previous work in applied research or previous study of research methods is ideal.

Are you interested?  Applications must be received by March 7.   Applications should consist of a current resume describing academic and professional experience and a letter of intent including a description of a proposed research topic. Send applications as an e-mail attachment to james.m.cook@maine.edu or by mail to James Cook, Assistant Professor of Social Science, University of Maine at Augusta, 46 University Drive, Augusta, ME 04330.

For more information on the application process or the Maine Policy Scholars program, please feel free to contact me at 621-3190 or james.m.cook@maine.edu.  Additional information is also available at http://www.mainecf.org/policyscholars.aspx on the web.

Recent Maine Policy Scholars, with links to their final policy memos, are:

The University Without Walls: Splash Brings Teaching and Learning Together

The traditional model of university learning truncates students’ vision on both ends. High school students may be told that they should aspire to higher education, but unless family members are part of that tradition they may not know why.  Once admitted, undergraduates study academic subjects and are tested for signs of accomplishment, but have limited opportunities to take the next step of sharing their knowledge and skills with others.

MIT Splash 2014 scene at the registration desk in the Infinite Corridor, Memorial Lobby

In my role as a parent, I recently accompanied my ninth-grader to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Splash program. Taking place every year on the weekend before Thanksgiving, Splash is a 2-day, 20-hour marathon of 1-hour classes taught by MIT undergraduates on subjects tending heavily toward the natural sciences, computer science and mathematics but also including the social sciences, humanities, arts and popular culture. Some classes are designed for attendees who are already advanced in mathematics, computer programming or other technical skills, but most classes require no prior knowledge at all. To get a full idea of the breadth of Splash, see 2014’s course catalog and its list of 618 unique classes. Any high school student may attend, and the cost of attendance is a relatively low $40 (with financial aid available).

MIT Splash Session on Systems of Voting and their functional outcomes -- November 2014

To keep Splash focused on high-schoolers and to let those high-schoolers spread their wings, parents are prohibited from attending sessions, but a separate session for parents led by Jordan Moldow ’14 was informative. Moldow’s “Behind the Scenes” presentation gave me a sense of the scale of this effort:

MIT Splash 2014 Statistics: 2500 students, 457 teachers, 618 unique classes, 30 student administrators

Put together 2500 students, 457 teachers, 30 administrators and many more volunteers and you’ve got a takeover of the MIT campus for a weekend. MIT donates space, which is helpful considering that this is a non-profit student effort. It’s also a smart move by MIT, considering that 2500 geek-minded young people every year have a chance to fall in love with the campus; you couldn’t dream of a better effort to recruit future applicants.

MIT’s Splash is not an overnight success; rather, it is the result of long, cumulative investment. MIT inaugurated its ESP (Educational Studies Program) for teens in 1957 with its High School Summer Project, and ESP launched its first Splash weekend in 1988. Splash is now in its 26th year, and has become such a phenomenon at MIT that according to Moldow, “a large portion of MIT students will at some point during their time here do something for Splash.”

The organizational effort to keep Splash is considerable. No Splash leaders or organizers are paid; all are volunteers. Chairs, treasurers, secretaries, administrative organizers, art directors, publicity directors, website administrators and directors of teacher development form a core group that meets twice a week during the school year, once to make group decisions and once more in a work session to carry out those decisions.

New Splash teachers are cultivated every year, months before the event itself. Veteran teachers act as directors of teacher development, Moldow explained to parents. Their role is to “communicate with teachers and critique their syllabi or class descriptions. We run 3-6 teacher trainings each year to talk about what are effective methods of presenting materials to a class, to make sure students absorb information, to make sure it is entertaining and to make sure that students are engaged.” A few members of the Cambridge, Massachusetts community volunteer to teach Splash classes, but most teachers are undergraduate MIT students. By learning to teach, MIT students improve their command of the subjects they study while practicing the important skill of communicating advanced knowledge in a concise and comprehensible way. “Just as we are trying to serve students by teaching them, so we are also trying to serve teachers by helping them to become better teachers,” Moldow said.

As Splash has become more and more popular at MIT, the organizers of Splash have sought to expand the program beyond that university’s walls to involve other campuses. In 2009, Splash alumni formed Learning Unlimited, a non-profit organization that organizes an annual “SplashCon” and supports over 20 universities that have started running their own local Splashes. If students at your university are interested in starting a Splash, Learning Unlimited will bring them into a nurturing network of advisors and supply them with the software they need to make a Splash run — at no charge. Get in touch with the leadership of Learning United here to spread this model of education that so spectacularly brings down the Ivory Tower’s walls.

Talking Around The University of Maine at Augusta: A Twitter Mention Graph

Like many institutions of higher education these days, the University of Maine at Augusta communicates about its accomplishments and keeps track of the work of others using the social media service Twitter. In its communications, UMA traces the paths of the community that surrounds it.

Unlike the social media platform Facebook (oriented toward friend and family relationships) or Pinterest (devoted to the sharing of images), Twitter acts like a news clipping service of sorts. Limited to 140 characters of text, Twitter posts are like headlines in a newspaper, with links to web pages containing more information. Making headlines social, Twitter posts can mention other Twitter accounts that are relevant to the story. By tracking those mentions, we can find communities of posters who find one another’s work relevant.

To generate the social network graph you see below, I’ve searched through all Twitter posts made this year by the university’s official account, @UMAugusta, and identified all of the other Twitter accounts that @UMAugusta has mentioned. In a second step, I looked at the records of each of the Twitter accounts @UMAugusta mentioned and found out whether and how often they referred to one another. The result, formally speaking, is a level 1.5 ego network. In the graph below, Twitter accounts are indicated with labeled dots; in the parlance of social network analysis, these are called “nodes” or “vertices.” The larger a dot is in the graph, the more often it is mentioned by other Twitter accounts. Mentions between Twitter accounts are indicated with curved lines, which network analysts refer to variously as “lines,” “arcs,” “edges” or “ties.” The darker a line is, the more often mentioning occurred between two Twitter accounts.

Who Mentions Whom? A social network of mentions over Twitter surrounding @UMAugusta from January to October 2014

To highlight structure in the network of mentions surrounding @UMAugusta, I identified five clusters of Twitter accounts who mentioned one another especially often. These clusters are color-coded in the network graph above. Because the identification of clusters of conversants was driven by data, not by pre-conceived notions about which accounts might “naturally” be grouped together, it is curious to see how particular clusters focus on particular domains. Some patterns:

  • The dark green cluster in the lower-right of the graph consists strongly of offices and officers connected to student life and services at the University of Maine at Augusta.
  • The dark blue cluster in the upper-left of the graph is anchored around newspapers and newspaper reporters of central and southern Maine — the Portland Press Herald, the Kennebec Journal of Augusta and the Morning Sentinel of Waterville. These three newspapers are not simply tied by geography, but are also published under the aegis of the MaineToday Media company; @centralmesports is a joint outlet of the Kennebec Journal and Morning Sentinel. Other central Maine institutions — Colby College and the Holocaust & Human Rights Center — are also featured in this cluster.
  • The light green cluster in the lower-left of the graph features strong representation in the arts, with the 5 Rivers Arts Alliance, Harlow Gallery, photographer Jill Guthrie, and The Band Apollo included.
  • Immediate substantive commonalities in the red upper-right cluster, including my own account, the Maine State Library, the Maine Humanities Council and a edu-metrics website NerdScholar are elusive. We are tied to one another because of our mutual communications across disciplinary boundaries.
  • The light-blue cluster at the bottom of the graph is a remainder category, consisting mostly of Twitter accounts that UMA has mentioned but that do not mention other accounts often.
  • Finally, although these clusters identify groups of accounts that communicate more often internally, connections between clusters are frequent, indicating that most of the accounts mentioned by the University of Maine at Augusta are part of a broader community.

Data mining and visualization for this graph of the @UMAugusta network were carried out using free and open source NodeXL software.

Convocation Remarks on the University of Maine at Augusta theme for 2014: “Innovation”

Convocation at the University of Maine at Augusta, September 19 2014

UMA Convocation Fall 2014
Framing the Theme – “Innovation”

Good afternoon.  Last spring, the UMA Faculty Colloquium Committee identified a special theme of innovation to reflect the University’s 50th anniversary. The committee asks that every member of the faculty, staff and student body read and reflect upon a book about innovation, Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell.  Look for activities throughout the year celebrating UMA’s 50 years of innovation.  As we kick off the year today, I’ve been asked to frame the theme of innovation in a few remarks.

When most of us hear the word “innovation,” we focus on the creation of something new.  But there is more to innovation than newness.  The word “innovation” comes from the Latin innovare, to renew or to make new.  What do we renew?  What do we make new?  Something that was already there.  To innovate is to make something new out of what came before.

To write a “novel” means literally to create a story that is new.  But in the introduction to her novel Frankenstein, a novel of ghastly innovation, author Mary Shelley admits stitching together her story from the science, philosophy and mythology of the day before adding her own animating spark.  “Everything must have a beginning,” Shelley writes, but “that beginning must be linked to something that went before…. Invention does not consist in creating out of void… the materials must, in the first place, be afforded.[i]”  The innovative stories we tell are based on what came before.

Every human being on Earth is a unique innovation, a Frankenstein experiment of sorts, with a genome ripped from our parents and stitched together in a brand new way.  Thanks to mutation, even identical twins don’t have exactly the same set of genes.  But neither is any human being entirely new.  We are variations on the genetic themes set by our parents, and as social scientists know we draw heavily from our environment in fashioning our public selves.  The new, innovative you is based on what came before.

The University of Maine at Augusta is itself an innovation.  Our history tells us that 50 years ago, there was no college or university in Augusta – and when UMA held its first classes on September 12 1965, it had no campus of its own.  Our first classrooms were in Cony High School, set aside for use after school hours; that’s innovative.  Our bookstore was fit into a Cony High School coat closet; that’s innovative[ii].  Even these humble beginnings were not completely new, but based on what came before: an existing school, repurposed and reimagined. In its next 50 years, UMA will rely on already existing strengths as it finds innovative new ways to fulfill its purpose.

And what is that purpose?  What is a university for?  At first glance, it may appear to some that a university is a business selling a product called a diploma to customers called students.  Once purchased, the diploma product can be redeemed by the customer for future economic profit.  Well, it certainly takes money for a person to live and for a university to run.  But is an education just another consumer purchase?  Is a university an assembly-line factory?  Are faculty here to sell?  Are students here to shop?

I think not.  We are here because we share a dream.  We dream of becoming more than we are.  We dream of remaking ourselves, putting parts of our lives that came before together with something new and adding an animating spark.  We know this dream of innovation can come true because we see it happen here every day — for some sooner, for some a bit later.  The poet Adelaide Anne Procter shares a truth we at UMA know well: if we miss our first shot at remaking ourselves a second chance, a third chance will come.  It is never too late.  Procter writes:

“Have we not all, amid life’s petty strife,

Some pure ideal of a noble life

That once seemed possible? Did we not hear

The flutter of its wings, and feel it near,

And just within our reach? It was. And yet

We lost it in this daily jar and fret,

And now live idle in a vague regret;

But still our place is kept, and it will wait,

Ready for us to fill it, soon or late.

No star is ever lost we once have seen,

We always may be what we might have been[iii].”

 

This is the heart of innovation: to draw from what came before, to honor those who inspire your work today, to dream of being more than you are.


[i] Shelley, Mary. 1818.  Frankenstein, or, the Modern Prometheus.  London: Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor and Jones.

[ii] Brookes, Kenneth. 1977.  The Story of the University of Maine at Augusta: The Jewett Years.  University of Maine at Augusta publication.

[iii] Procter, Adelaide Anne. 1864. “A Legend of Provence” (excerpt).  P. 191 in The Poems of Adelaide A. Procter.  Boston: Ticknor and Fields.

A Wizarding School

Did you know that as part of the University of Maine system’s commitment to public transparency, you can look up the annual salaries of “regular employees” employed by the system and its seven campuses? It’s true. Looking through November 2013 data (the latest available), I notice that the University of Maine campus in Orono employs two people under the official job title of “Wizard.” One of them is even a “Wizard Coordinator.”

Think carefully: if I ask you how to get to the University of Maine — exactly how to get to the University of Maine — can you give me absolutely precise directions? Did you ever see odd-colored lights streaming out of the on-campus dorms late at night? Have you ever had a conversation with a graduate or current student of University of Maine student in which you ask them what they’re studying and they respond in vague terms (“this and that, “stuff,” “qualitative research,” “arts & sciences”) and then quickly change the subject?

I can’t speak my claim out loud, because I don’t have proof, but you know what I’m suggesting. Think about it — and look for the signs.

Visiting Professor Mojca Krevel Leads UMA Colloquium on CyberPunk Lit and Technology: March 26 at Noon

Sci-Fi Live: Cyberpunk Lecture by UMA Visiting Professor Mojca Krevel

Sci-Fi Live: From William Gibson to Ray Kurzweil

Mojca Krevel, Professor of English at University of Ljubljana and UMA Visiting Scholar

Wednesday, March 26, Noon to 1 pm, to be followed by a reception from 1 pm to 2pm

University of Maine at Augusta Katz Library
46 University Drive, Augusta ME 04330

Students, Staff, Faculty and Community are Welcome

Abstract:
“I got the idea for the topic of this talk a few months ago when, while randomly flipping through channels, my attention was caught by the familiar phantasmagoria of flickering trajectories of brain-computer interfacing and pulsing images of neurons firing to computer-generated data. What initially looked like a yet unseen documentary on the 1980s cyberpunk movement, was, in fact, a film version of Ray Kurzweil’s 2005 best-selling The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Technology. The resemblance between Kurzweil’s vision of the future and the worlds of literary cyberpunk, especially those envisioned in William Gibson’s Sprawl trilogy, seemed uncanny.

“The thing is, Kurzweil’s predictions for the future fundamentally rely on the actual developments and developmental trends in 1990s and 2000s technology and science. Kurzweil is, after all, an award-winning inventor, mathematician, and one of the leading experts on computer and artificial intelligence. William Gibson, on the other hand, is a full-time sci-fi writer with a BA in English, who provided the blueprint for what were to become the trademarks of the 1980s cyberpunk writing: computers, computerized environments and artificial intelligence. But while fuelling digital fantasies of thousands of computer geeks, Gibson wrote most of his Sprawl trilogy on a typewriter and consciously avoided using the internet well into the 1990s.

“In my talk I will focus on two things. First I will present the extent to which Kurzweil’s informed and well-founded projections coincide with the invented concepts and motifs in Gibson’s 1980s Sprawl trilogy. I will then consider the correspondence from the perspective of the hitherto established mechanisms governing the functioning and the structure of the postmodern epoch. Relying primarily on the concepts and terminology developed by Jean Baudrillard I will show that the high degree of correspondence is far from uncanny; it is practically inevitable given the popularity of Gibson’s trilogy. The explanation will also make clear why the criticism and controversies surrounding the accuracy and feasibility of Kurzweil’s predictions are ultimately irrelevant to the topic at hand.”


UMA RaP Colloquium SeriesThe Research and Pedagogy program is made possible by the support of the Faculty Senate and the Office of the Provost.  We are also grateful to the office of President Handley for making this special reception possible.  If you are interested in presenting your work at a future RaP session, please contact Jodi Williams at 621-3341, Sarah Hentges at 262-7762 or James Cook at 621-3190.

Don’t-Miss UMA Colloquium: Laura Rodas on Academic Integrity, 2/12/2014

The UMA RaP Colloquium Series presents

“The State of Academic Integrity at UMA”

Laura Rodas, Coordinator of Community Standards and Mediation
Wednesday, February 12, 12 noon
University of Maine at Augusta Katz Library

As part of its continuing commitment to building intellectual community, the University of Maine at Augusta holds a regular Research and Pedagogy (RaP) colloquium series at which UMA faculty and staff present works in progress to their peers. Ensuing discussion promotes collaboration through the exchange of ideas and the development of relationships across colleges, programs, departments and disciplines. When we meet to present and to learn, we discover that amidst the accumulated knowledge of the centuries, there are still new thoughts to be spoken out loud.

Academic honesty in higher education is of the utmost importance. During February 12th’s RaP session, Laura Rodas will lead discussion focused on UMA’s Academic Integrity Code and procedures, the responsibilities of faculty members, students, and the Office of the Dean of Students and the logistics of making a complaint.  Special attention will be paid to delineation of academic sanctions vs. disciplinary sanctions, repeat violations, and examples of challenging academic integrity matters.  A question and answer period with refreshments will follow.

The Research And Pedagogy program is made possible by the support of the Faculty Senate and the Office of the Provost.  If you are interested in giving a presentation at a future RAP session, please contact:

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